Month: February 2017

Colloidal Silver Taken With Antibiotics – Thousands of Times more Effective!

Colloidal Silver Taken With Antibiotics – Thousands of Times more Effective!

Syndicated from: http://www.thefullmonte.com/colloidal-silver-taken-with-antibiotics-thousands-of-times-more-effective/

Silver and Antibiotics BenefitsTaking Silver with Antibiotics Makes Them Super Charged!

The antimicrobial treatment could help to solve modern bacterial resistance
By Brian Owens, Nature magazine on June 20, 2013 – Originally posted here.

Like werewolves and vampires, bacteria have a weakness: silver. The precious metal has been used to fight infection for thousands of years — Hippocrates first described its antimicrobial properties in 400 bc — but how it works has been a mystery. Now, a team led by James Collins, a biomedical engineer at Boston University in Massachusetts, has described how silver can disrupt bacteria, and shown that the ancient treatment could help to deal with the thoroughly modern scourge of antibiotic resistance. The work is published today in Science Translational Medicine.

“Resistance is growing, while the number of new antibiotics in development is dropping,” says Collins. “We wanted to find a way to make what we have work better.”

Collins and his team found that silver — in the form of dissolved ions — attacks bacterial cells in two main ways: it makes the cell membrane more permeable, and it interferes with the cell’s metabolism, leading to the overproduction of reactive, and often toxic, oxygen compounds. Both mechanisms could potentially be harnessed to make today’s antibiotics more effective against resistant bacteria, Collins says.

Resistance is futile
Many antibiotics are thought to kill their targets by producing reactive oxygen compounds, and Collins and his team showed that when boosted with a small amount of silver these drugs could kill between 10 and 1,000 times as many bacteria. The increased membrane permeability also allows more antibiotics to enter the bacterial cells, which may overwhelm the resistance mechanisms that rely on shuttling the drug back out.

That disruption to the cell membrane also increased the effectiveness of vancomycin, a large-molecule antibiotic, on Gram-negative bacteria — which have a protective outer coating. Gram-negative bacterial cells can often be impenetrable to antibiotics made of larger molecules.

“It’s not so much a silver bullet; more a silver spoon to help the Gram-negative bacteria take their medicine,” says Collins.

Toxic assets
Vance Fowler, an infectious-disease physician at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, says the work is “really cool” but sounds a note of caution about the potential toxicity of silver. “It has had a checkered past,” he says.

In the 1990s, for example, a heart valve made by St. Jude Medical, based in St. Paul, Minnesota, included parts covered with a silver coating called Silzone to fight infection. “It did a fine job of preventing infection,” says Fowler. “The problem was that the silver was also toxic to heart tissue.” As a result the valves often leaked.

Before adding silver to antibiotics, “we’ll have to address the toxicity very carefully”, says Fowler. Ingesting too much silver can also cause argyria, a condition in which the skin turns a blue-grey color — and the effect is permanent.

Collins says that he and his colleagues saw good results in mice using non-toxic amounts of silver. But, he adds, there are ways to reduce the risk even further. “We’re also encouraging people to look at what features of silver caused the helpful effects, so they can look for non-toxic versions,” he says.

 

 

 

Colloidal Silver Taken With Antibiotics – Thousands of Times more Effective!

Colloidal Silver Taken With Antibiotics – Thousands of Times more Effective!

Syndicated from: http://www.thefullmonte.com/colloidal-silver-taken-with-antibiotics-thousands-of-times-more-effective/

Silver and Antibiotics BenefitsTaking Silver with Antibiotics Makes Them Super Charged!

The antimicrobial treatment could help to solve modern bacterial resistance
By Brian Owens, Nature magazine on June 20, 2013 – Originally posted here.

Like werewolves and vampires, bacteria have a weakness: silver. The precious metal has been used to fight infection for thousands of years — Hippocrates first described its antimicrobial properties in 400 bc — but how it works has been a mystery. Now, a team led by James Collins, a biomedical engineer at Boston University in Massachusetts, has described how silver can disrupt bacteria, and shown that the ancient treatment could help to deal with the thoroughly modern scourge of antibiotic resistance. The work is published today in Science Translational Medicine.

“Resistance is growing, while the number of new antibiotics in development is dropping,” says Collins. “We wanted to find a way to make what we have work better.”

Collins and his team found that silver — in the form of dissolved ions — attacks bacterial cells in two main ways: it makes the cell membrane more permeable, and it interferes with the cell’s metabolism, leading to the overproduction of reactive, and often toxic, oxygen compounds. Both mechanisms could potentially be harnessed to make today’s antibiotics more effective against resistant bacteria, Collins says.

Resistance is futile
Many antibiotics are thought to kill their targets by producing reactive oxygen compounds, and Collins and his team showed that when boosted with a small amount of silver these drugs could kill between 10 and 1,000 times as many bacteria. The increased membrane permeability also allows more antibiotics to enter the bacterial cells, which may overwhelm the resistance mechanisms that rely on shuttling the drug back out.

That disruption to the cell membrane also increased the effectiveness of vancomycin, a large-molecule antibiotic, on Gram-negative bacteria — which have a protective outer coating. Gram-negative bacterial cells can often be impenetrable to antibiotics made of larger molecules.

“It’s not so much a silver bullet; more a silver spoon to help the Gram-negative bacteria take their medicine,” says Collins.

Toxic assets
Vance Fowler, an infectious-disease physician at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, says the work is “really cool” but sounds a note of caution about the potential toxicity of silver. “It has had a checkered past,” he says.

In the 1990s, for example, a heart valve made by St. Jude Medical, based in St. Paul, Minnesota, included parts covered with a silver coating called Silzone to fight infection. “It did a fine job of preventing infection,” says Fowler. “The problem was that the silver was also toxic to heart tissue.” As a result the valves often leaked.

Before adding silver to antibiotics, “we’ll have to address the toxicity very carefully”, says Fowler. Ingesting too much silver can also cause argyria, a condition in which the skin turns a blue-grey color — and the effect is permanent.

Collins says that he and his colleagues saw good results in mice using non-toxic amounts of silver. But, he adds, there are ways to reduce the risk even further. “We’re also encouraging people to look at what features of silver caused the helpful effects, so they can look for non-toxic versions,” he says.

 

 

 

Starbucks Stock Crashes After Plan to Hire 10,000 Refugees

Starbucks Stock Crashes After Plan to Hire 10,000 Refugees

Syndicated from: http://www.thefullmonte.com/starbucks-stock-crashes-after-plan-to-hire-10000-refugees/

Starbucks Brand Crashes After Announcement of Plan to Hire 10,000 Muslim ‘Refugees’

Its brand name has lost its luster with customers

Muslims or Americans?
Image Credits: Pexels.

The Starbucks Coffee brand has taken a major hit since the company’s announcement that it would hire 10,000 Muslim “refugees” in response to President Donald Trump’s temporary travel moratorium in January.

Starbucks was one of those early to criticize President Trump for putting a temporary hold on immigration from a list of seven terror-torn countries flagged by the Obama administration. In response, the coffee house giant pledged to hire 10,000 Muslim refugees over five years in protest against Trump’s order.

But since the company issued its anti-Trump statement its brand name has lost its luster with customers. Perception levels of the Starbucks brand name fell by an incredible two-thirds since its January announcement, according to a YouGov survey, as reported by Yahoo Finance.

The survey measures how potential customers feel about a company’s brand and asks if they have “heard anything about the brand in the last two weeks, through advertising, news or word of mouth, was it positive or negative.”

In the week before the company’s January refugees announcement, 30% of respondents said they would consider spending money at Starbucks. But after the statement that number fell to 24 percent, the survey discovered.

The company’s announcement immediately sparked a #BoycottStarbucks movement on Twitter and brought condemnation from coast to coast.

Read more.

Starbucks Stock Crashes After Plan to Hire 10,000 Refugees

Starbucks Stock Crashes After Plan to Hire 10,000 Refugees

Syndicated from: http://www.thefullmonte.com/starbucks-stock-crashes-after-plan-to-hire-10000-refugees/

Starbucks Brand Crashes After Announcement of Plan to Hire 10,000 Muslim ‘Refugees’

Its brand name has lost its luster with customers

Muslims or Americans?
Image Credits: Pexels.

The Starbucks Coffee brand has taken a major hit since the company’s announcement that it would hire 10,000 Muslim “refugees” in response to President Donald Trump’s temporary travel moratorium in January.

Starbucks was one of those early to criticize President Trump for putting a temporary hold on immigration from a list of seven terror-torn countries flagged by the Obama administration. In response, the coffee house giant pledged to hire 10,000 Muslim refugees over five years in protest against Trump’s order.

But since the company issued its anti-Trump statement its brand name has lost its luster with customers. Perception levels of the Starbucks brand name fell by an incredible two-thirds since its January announcement, according to a YouGov survey, as reported by Yahoo Finance.

The survey measures how potential customers feel about a company’s brand and asks if they have “heard anything about the brand in the last two weeks, through advertising, news or word of mouth, was it positive or negative.”

In the week before the company’s January refugees announcement, 30% of respondents said they would consider spending money at Starbucks. But after the statement that number fell to 24 percent, the survey discovered.

The company’s announcement immediately sparked a #BoycottStarbucks movement on Twitter and brought condemnation from coast to coast.

Read more.

AI Program Learns to Write It’s Own Code

AI Program Learns to Write It’s Own Code

Syndicated from: http://www.thefullmonte.com/ai-program-learns-to-write-its-own-code/

AI Computer Learns to Write Code on it’s Own!

Written Originally by: Matt Reynolds

OUT of the way, human, I’ve got this covered. A machine learning system has gained the ability to write its own code.

Created by researchers at Microsoft and the University of Cambridge, the system, called DeepCoder, solved basic challenges of the kind set by programming competitions. This kind of approach could make it much easier for people to build simple programs without knowing how to write code.

“All of a sudden people could be so much more productive,” says Armando Solar-Lezama at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who was not involved in the work. “They could build systems that it [would be] impossible to build before.”

Ultimately, the approach could allow non-coders to simply describe an idea for a program and let the system build it, says Marc Brockschmidt, one of DeepCoder’s creators at Microsoft Research in Cambridge, UK.

DeepCoder uses a technique called program synthesis: creating new programs by piecing together lines of code taken from existing software – just like a programmer might. Given a list of inputs and outputs for each code fragment, DeepCoder learned which pieces of code were needed to achieve the desired result overall.

“It could allow non-coders to simply describe an idea for a program and let the system build it”

One advantage of letting an AI loose in this way is that it can search more thoroughly and widely than a human coder, so could piece together source code in a way humans may not have thought of. What’s more, DeepCoder uses machine learning to scour databases of source code and sort the fragments according to its view of their probable usefulness.

All this makes the system much faster than its predecessors. DeepCoder created working programs in fractions of a second, whereas older systems take minutes to trial many different combinations of lines of code before piecing together something that can do the job. And because DeepCoder learns which combinations of source code work and which ones don’t as it goes along, it improves every time it tries a new problem.

The technology could have many applications. In 2015, researchers at MIT created a program that automatically fixed software bugs by replacing faulty lines of code with working lines from other programs. Brockschmidt says that future versions could make it very easy to build routine programs that scrape information from websites, or automatically categorise Facebook photos, for example, without human coders having to lift a finger

“The potential for automation that this kind of technology offers could really signify an enormous [reduction] in the amount of effort it takes to develop code,” says Solar-Lezama.

But he doesn’t think these systems will put programmers out of a job. With program synthesis automating some of the most tedious parts of programming, he says, coders will be able to devote their time to more sophisticated work.

At the moment, DeepCoder is only capable of solving programming challenges that involve around five lines of code. But in the right coding language, a few lines are all that’s needed for fairly complicated programs.

“Generating a really big piece of code in one shot is hard, and potentially unrealistic,” says Solar-Lezama. “But really big pieces of code are built by putting together lots of little pieces of code.”

This article appeared in print under the headline “Computers are learning to code for themselves”

Sunlight Heals Cancer

Sunlight Heals Cancer

Syndicated from: http://www.thefullmonte.com/sunlight-heals-cancer/

What they won’t tell you: The sun is a full-spectrum medicine that can heal cancer

Original post here.


“Those that have attempted to convince the world that the Sun, the Earth’s primary source of energy and life causes cancer, have done so with malicious intent to deceive the masses into retreating from the one thing that can prevent disease.” — Dave Mihalovic, Naturopathic Doctor
and writer. [1]

Truth is, we’ve been systematically lied to about the sun and skin cancer for years. This video presentation explains fully. How many know that there is no definitive proof that the sun alone causes skin cancer? [2]

Can the sun cure cancer?

In the book The Healing Sun, author Dr. Richard Hobday documents a wide array of studies which show that the sun protects against cancer of the breast, colon, ovaries and prostate. It can also prevent diabetes, multiple sclerosis, heart disease and high blood pressure, osteoporosis, psoriasis and seasonal affective disorder (SAD). [3]

Then there’s the case of Dr. Harland G. Call, who was diagnosed with skin cancer and was advised by a surgeon to have it removed. Instead, he decided to sunbath the cancerous area.

After a short period of continuous sunbathing, the skin cancer was completely gone. He returned to his MD for a confirmation, and his doctor confirmed that the skin cancer had disappeared and no surgery was required. [3]

According to Dr. Bernarr Zovluck, “Cancer is helped by sunbathing, writes Dr. Zane R. Kime. Kime writes
that those who get more sunlight have less cancer. Sunbathing heals
cancer by building up the immune system and increasing the oxygen in the
tissues.” [4]

Still, we’re bombarded almost daily with dire “warnings” from reputable “authorities” admonishing us, for our own good of course, to avoid the sun at all costs.

Epidemic levels of sun phobia

For example, Dr. Robin Ashinoff, chief of dermatological and cosmetic surgery at Hackensack University Medical Center advised: “Wearing sunscreen and then deliberately going out in the sun is almost as [bad] as going out with no sunscreen at all.”

She continued, “You don’t get burned, but the UV rays are still getting into your skin. Sunscreen is important, but you should also wear the right clothing and shield yourself as much as possible from direct sun exposure.” [5]

Is Dr. Ashinoff advocating a vampire lifestyle? The reality is that the vast majority of people, including doctors, have been duped into believing the myth that the sun is toxic, carcinogenic and a deadly health hazard.

That’s why most people slavishly and lavishly slather toxic sunscreens on their skin whenever they anticipate direct contact with the sun’s rays. But in fact, most conventional sunscreens are cancer-causing biohazards. [6] [7]

Meanwhile, the multi-billion-dollar cancer industry and the billion-dollar toxic sunscreen industry are making hay with this hoax. True believers are left scratching their heads in bewilderment as statistics reveal that the dreaded malignant melanoma skin cancer is on the rise. [8]

The sun doctor

Dr. Auguste Rollier opened the first European “Sun Clinic” in 1903 at Leysin, Switzerland. He also wrote a very influential book: Heliotherapy. He was considered the most famous heliotherapist in the world.

At his peak, he operated 36 clinics. Dr. Rollier espoused that the sun was an unsurpassed broad-spectrum medicine. He healed his patients using a wholesome diet combined with the power of the sun.

By 1933, there were over 165 different diseases successfully treated with heliotherapy including tuberculosis, wounds, rickets and much more. Dr. Rollier’s death in 1954 marked the end of sun therapy not because it was ineffective, but because it had been replaced by Big Pharma’s “miracle drugs.” [9]

Sources for this article include:

[1] http://preventdisease.com

[2] https://www.youtube.com

[3] http://online.wsj.com

[4] http://curezone.org

[5] http://www.northjersey.com

[6] http://www.faim.org

[7] http://www.naturalnews.com

[8]http://institutefornaturalhealing.com

[9] http://www.naturalnews.com

About the author:
Paul Fassa is dedicated to warning others about the current corruption of food and medicine and guiding them towards direction for better health with no restrictions on health freedom.

You can check out his many non-compromising cutting edge, non-fluff articles here http://www.naturalnews.com/Author712.html

And you can visit his blog at http://healthmaven.blogspot.com

 

Amish Farmer to be Jailed for 68 Years for Homemade Products

Amish Farmer to be Jailed for 68 Years for Homemade Products

Syndicated from: http://www.thefullmonte.com/amish-farmer-to-be-jailed-for-68-years-for-homemade-products/

Amish farmer facing 68 years in federal prison for making homemade products

original post here.


When most people imagine their golden years, they don’t envision spending the last decades of their life in a federal prison, but for 56-year-old Samuel Girod, that threat is very real — thanks to the FDA. Girod is facing 68 years in jail for the simple crime of creating his own all-natural homemade products. Father to 12 and grandfather to 25, Girod has been facing a 12-count indictment since 2015.

Trouble first arose for the Amish farmer back in 2013, when someone reported his homemade products to the state health department of Missouri. An injunction was put in place by a federal judge in the state, banning Girod from making some of his products until specific conditions were met. One of those conditions was an inspection of the property where Girod’s products were made — prompting the state of Kentucky to become involved. Production of these homemade, natural products reportedly took place at Girod’s family home, somewhere along Satterfield Lane in Bath County.

Bath County residents were seemingly appalled when they learned of their neighbor’s fate. “I can’t even figure out what he has done wrong. They live at the foot of the cross and the thought of one of them intentionally doing something wrong is outrageous,” Suza Moody, a fellow Bath County resident commented.

Family friend Sally Oh said, “They are just devastated. I mean when they brought him out in handcuffs. It was awful.” Oh went on to say that the FDA had taken issue with the way some of Girod’s products were labeled. Girod’s Chickweed Salve was a particular point of contention. According to Oh, the salve’s ingredients include rosemary, beeswax, olive oil.

“It said ‘Chickweed Salve’ up top, then on down said ‘Cures Cancer.’ Which for some people it did, but he can’t say that. So he changed it to say ‘Healing Chickweed,’ but they said no you can’t say healing. So now it just says ‘Original Chickweed,’” she explained.

Moody questioned whether or not the proposed punishment really fit the crime. “I mean do you go to jail because you’ve messed up a label on a product?”

“I thought you went to jail because you did something bad. I mean he mislabeled something? I doubt he knew any better,” she added.

According to the FDA, Girod is also guilty of handing out pamphlets that advertised his products’ efficacy in the treatment of a variety of conditions. Because of those claims, the FDA says the products are defined as drugs, under the federal food, drug, and cosmetic act — even though multiple tests have shown no drugs are used in the products.

Defined drugs are also required to have their place of production registered with the FDA. Unsurprisingly, the Girod farm is not registered — and they likely did not know the salves they were making could be construed as “drugs.”

Another one of Girod’s products, TO-MOR-GONE, has also come under fire. The product is said to be “very good at removing tumors,” and also contains bloodroot — which can be caustic and cause scarring. This, the FDA alleges, makes for much more than a simple labeling mistake. Along with all of this, the FDA claims that Girod prevented their agents from entering the family home to “inspect” the conditions, and allege that he continued to sell his products after the injunction was placed.

Since 2015, Girod has fired his appointed attorney and has chosen to represent himself. WKYT reports, “The Amish farmer filed a motion to dismiss his case, citing a lack of due process, lack of standing, and lack of jurisdiction. A judge denied the motion and set a status conference back in August.”

Girod missed the status hearing, Ms. Oh believes that he simply did not understand he had to be there. A warrant was then issued for his arrest.

Due to the increasingly volatile nature of the situation, the Bath County Sheriff reportedly wrote a letter to the authorities involved, citing his concerns about the “ongoing ruthless and relentless attack against one of his constituents.” The letter also noted that Girod had been placed in the protective custody of his office.

For about five months, Girod was considered a “fugitive” and was arrested at the family farm in Janurary. He now waits in jail without bail until his trial date arrives, which is scheduled for late February.

The real issue here is the fact that the FDA is persecuting a man with no ill intent: the so-called crimes he committed with no malicious intent, and his products have reportedly never harmed anyone. And yet, the FDA approves drugs that don’t work and come with horrible side effects, as long they are listed on the label. The agency has even banned intravenous vitamin C, so it’s not that surprising that they’re throwing the book at Girod.

The extreme punishment being proposed for Girod is far and away from fitting the “crime” he committed — not that you can really call it a crime; a mistake perhaps. His failure to understand the inner-workings of the corrupt FDA system does not warrant 68 years of imprisonment.

Child rapists go free while an Amish man will likely spend the rest of his life in prison for making salves. And this is what we’re supposed to believe justice looks like?

Sources:

FreedomOutpost.com

Kentucky.com

WKYT.com